News

Award-Winning Photographs on Display at EBR Main Library

Roadshow of 2018’s Best Avian Photography Coming to Baton Rouge

Visit the East Baton Rouge Main Library between April 1st and April 7th to walk among the winning bird photographs from the 2018 Audubon Photography Awards and learn more about local birdlife. Reproductions of the winning photos will be available for sale. 

The winning photographers and their stunning photographs were selected from more than 8,000 entries submitted by photographers from all 50 states, Washington, D.C., and 10 Canadian provinces.

This year’s exquisite photographs celebrate the splendor of many bird species protected under the 100-year-old Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), the most important bird conservation law, which is currently under siege in Congress and by the Department of the Interior.

See the winning photos here!

JUDGES (Meet them!):

  • Steve Freligh, publisher, Nature’s Best Photography 
  • Melissa Groo, wildlife photographer and winner of the 2015 contest’s Grand Prize
  • Kenn Kaufman, bird expert and Audubon field editor
  • Sabine Meyer, photography director, National Audubon Society
  • Allen Murabayashi, chairman and co-founder, PhotoShelter

Judging criteria: technical quality, originality, artistic merit. All photographers must follow Audubon’s Guide to Ethical Bird Photography.

Canon is the official sponsor of the 2018 Audubon Photography Awards exhibition, which brings the prize-winning photographs to Audubon centers and chapters around the United States. 

To learn more about the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and how Audubon is fighting to protect migratory birds in North America, please visit: https://www.audubon.org/news/audubon-lawsuit-seeks-restore-protections-migratory-birds.

For high-resolution image files and more information on the Audubon Photography Awards please email media@audubon.org.

The National Audubon Society protects birds and the places they need, today and tomorrow. Audubon works throughout the Americas using, science, advocacy, education and on-the-ground conservation. State programs, nature centers, chapters, and partners give Audubon an unparalleled wingspan that reaches millions of people each year to inform, inspire, and unite diverse communities in conservation action. A nonprofit conservation organization since 1905, Audubon believes in a world in which people and wildlife thrive. Learn more and how to help at www.audubon.org and follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @audubonsociety.

How you can help, right now